Cobalt Cranes Cerebral & Cardiak Rock 'n' Roll : Review From Bangstyle

By Danny De Maio For a band to do shoegaze well today without being filed under “My Bloody Valentine-indebted” is nearly impossible. But some bands are able to jump that barrier and exist in the realm of the genre. Ladies and gentlemen, with that said, I introduce you to Cobalt Cranes and their new album Head In The Clouds. It’s a fine day when a band is able to marry the guitar technique of 50′s doo-wop and Sonic Youth’s aggressive fuzz, and that is exactly what we get in “How Many Fingers” and “Shake.” Hard-charging moments like these aren’t all that Cobalt Cranes have in-store though. Some of the album’s boldest songs are the midtempo one’s anchored by some gorgeous female vocals. “Head in the Clouds” and “Salvation” have become tracks that I’ve been playing repeatedly throughout the last couple weeks, not even thinking about needing to write a review. When you get a ton a press blasts from bands, it’s sometimes difficult to sort through it all, but I can say with complete honesty that Cobalt Cranes slowing eased their way into my ears and genuinely won me over.    Cobalt Cranes own a power in their songwriting that is usually lacking when bands decide they want to run their guitar through 8 pedals. Instead of relying on the pedals to make their guitar parts pop, they actually write bold, energetic guitar riffs. You won’t have to stretch your ears to catch all the nuances to persuade yourself that this is a great guitar rock band. All it’s going to take is hearing “Devil’s All Around,” the anthem-ready “Golden Mansion,” and the addictive “Count the Ways.” I’m willing to bet that all you’ll need is the guitar breakdown at 2:15 to win you over completely. The Los Angeles band fills a major hole in the psych-rock scene after Darker My Love meandered into oblivion. There’s nothing challenging to the “system” of rock’n’roll here, and perhaps that’s the point. Los Angeles bands often get either too caught up in the easiest way to cash or the easiest way to credibility (“Hey, dudes, let’s just play the same riff for 35 minutes and scream Bukowski poems over the guitar fuzz!”), but Cobalt Cranes know that they’re able to write great songs without ditching their effects pedals. What Head In The Clouds shows itself to be is a full-bodied, consistent rock’n’roll album that’s as concerned with the heart as it is the mind.   Read it Here: BANGSTYLE  

By Danny De Maio

For a band to do shoegaze well today without being filed under “My Bloody Valentine-indebted” is nearly impossible. But some bands are able to jump that barrier and exist in the realm of the genre. Ladies and gentlemen, with that said, I introduce you to Cobalt Cranes and their new album Head In The Clouds.

It’s a fine day when a band is able to marry the guitar technique of 50′s doo-wop and Sonic Youth’s aggressive fuzz, and that is exactly what we get in “How Many Fingers” and “Shake.” Hard-charging moments like these aren’t all that Cobalt Cranes have in-store though. Some of the album’s boldest songs are the midtempo one’s anchored by some gorgeous female vocals. “Head in the Clouds” and “Salvation” have become tracks that I’ve been playing repeatedly throughout the last couple weeks, not even thinking about needing to write a review. When you get a ton a press blasts from bands, it’s sometimes difficult to sort through it all, but I can say with complete honesty that Cobalt Cranes slowing eased their way into my ears and genuinely won me over.

   Cobalt Cranes own a power in their songwriting that is usually lacking when bands decide they want to run their guitar through 8 pedals. Instead of relying on the pedals to make their guitar parts pop, they actually write bold, energetic guitar riffs. You won’t have to stretch your ears to catch all the nuances to persuade yourself that this is a great guitar rock band. All it’s going to take is hearing “Devil’s All Around,” the anthem-ready “Golden Mansion,” and the addictive “Count the Ways.” I’m willing to bet that all you’ll need is the guitar breakdown at 2:15 to win you over completely.

The Los Angeles band fills a major hole in the psych-rock scene after Darker My Love meandered into oblivion. There’s nothing challenging to the “system” of rock’n’roll here, and perhaps that’s the point. Los Angeles bands often get either too caught up in the easiest way to cash or the easiest way to credibility (“Hey, dudes, let’s just play the same riff for 35 minutes and scream Bukowski poems over the guitar fuzz!”), but Cobalt Cranes know that they’re able to write great songs without ditching their effects pedals. What Head In The Clouds shows itself to be is a full-bodied, consistent rock’n’roll album that’s as concerned with the heart as it is the mind.

  Read it Here: BANGSTYLE